Project No. 07

STAMPEDE: which drug will work best for me?

Developing a test to choose treatment for individual patients

S c r o l l   R i g h t

What could this achieve?

Combined with other STAMPEDE research projects, this project could lead to the development of a cheap test which doctors could use to choose the right treatment for patients based on the DNA profile of their individual cancer.

How?

The team will look at DNA in prostate tumours from men taking part in STAMPEDE, one of the largest ongoing UK clinical trials into advanced prostate cancer. They will explore whether differences in DNA can be used to divide the men into groups which are more or less likely to respond to the treatments used in STAMPEDE.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by analysing the tumour samples to build up DNA profiles. They will then start to explore how the different profiles respond to different treatments.

What could this achieve?

Combined with other STAMPEDE research projects, this project could lead to the development of a cheap test which doctors could use to choose the right treatment for patients based on the DNA profile of their individual cancer.

How?

The team will look at DNA in prostate tumours from men taking part in STAMPEDE, one of the largest ongoing UK clinical trials into advanced prostate cancer. They will explore whether differences in DNA can be used to divide the men into groups which are more or less likely to respond to the treatments used in STAMPEDE.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by analysing the tumour samples to build up DNA profiles. They will then start to explore how the different profiles respond to different treatments.

Project Start

January 2020

Research Facility

UCL

Budget

£136,000/year

End

January 2023

The Project

Some men with prostate cancer respond better to treatments than other men do. Understanding why this is will help us to treat prostate cancer better for all men.

STAMPEDE is one of the biggest ongoing clinical trials into advanced prostate cancer in the UK, which has already changed the way prostate cancer is treated. This research will look at DNA in tumours from men taking part in STAMPEDE to see if differences in DNA can be used to divide the men into groups which are more or less likely to respond to different treatments. The research team is interested in copy number profiling, which means there may be extra copies of some DNA, or some DNA may be lost in some tumours. By using DNA from men on the STAMPEDE trial, this project can gather information on some of the most cutting-edge new treatments, such as combining traditional androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with abiraterone (a relatively new drug sold as Zytiga) or docetaxel (Taxotere, a chemotherapy drug). By combining the results from this project with other research projects from STAMPEDE, this team have a unique opportunity to develop a cheap test which could soon be used in the clinic to help doctors choose the right treatment for patients based on their individual cancer.

Check back soon to find out more about Professor Gert Attard’s research project!

 

 

Press enter or esc to cancel