Project No. 09

Improving Radiotherapy

Combining radiotherapy with other drugs to improve patient outcomes

S c r o l l   R i g h t

What could this achieve?

Exciting new radiotherapy approaches can carry radioactive treatments directly to the cancer site, but this doesn't work for everyone. Combining radiotherapy with other treatments could lead to better outcomes for those with advanced prostate cancer and fewer side-effects.

How?

Professor Cornelissen and his team will combine the radiotherapy treatment 177LU-PSMA with approximately 1,000 drugs. They will identify which combinations are most effective, and study the effects of the combinations on the biology of the cancer.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by exploring a large number of different combinations before taking the most effective forward for more detailed tests to see if it is likely to be safe and effective in patients.

What could this achieve?

Exciting new radiotherapy approaches can carry radioactive treatments directly to the cancer site, but this doesn't work for everyone. Combining radiotherapy with other treatments could lead to better outcomes for those with advanced prostate cancer and fewer side-effects.

How?

Professor Cornelissen and his team will combine the radiotherapy treatment 177LU-PSMA with approximately 1,000 drugs. They will identify which combinations are most effective, and study the effects of the combinations on the biology of the cancer.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by exploring a large number of different combinations before taking the most effective forward for more detailed tests to see if it is likely to be safe and effective in patients.

Project Start

January 2020

Research Facility

University of Oxford

Budget

£100,000/year

End

January 2021

The Project

Exciting new radiotherapy approaches can hunt out cancer and carry radioactive treatments directly to the cancer site. PSMA is a protein which exists on the surface of most prostate cancer cells, but is not on normal cells. PSMA can be used to tell cancer and normal cells apart, and even to guide radiotherapy directly to the cancer cells. While this new treatment is becoming more and more available in the UK and has potential to help many men, including men whose prostate cancer has spread to other places in the body, it doesn’t work for all patients right now. This project aims to make PSMA treatment work better and work in more men by combining it with other drugs. For example, because radiotherapy works by damaging the DNA inside a cancer cell, adding another drug which damages DNA in a different may might make both treatments work even better than either of them used on their own. Professor Cornelissen will combine the radiotherapy treatment 177LU-PSMA with approximately 1,000 drugs to start with, before taking the best three and more thoroughly testing both how likely they are to reduce cancer in humans and how likely they are to have side effects.

Check back soon to find out more about Professor Bart Cornelissen’s research project!

 

 

Press enter or esc to cancel