Project No. 09

Improving Radiotherapy

Combining radiotherapy with other drugs to improve patient outcomes

S c r o l l   R i g h t

What could this achieve?

Exciting new radiotherapy approaches can carry radioactive treatments directly to the cancer site, but this doesn't work for everyone. Combining radiotherapy with other treatments could lead to better outcomes and fewer side-effects for those with advanced prostate cancer.

How?

Professor Cornelissen and his team will combine the radiotherapy treatment 177LU-PSMA with approximately 1,000 drugs. They will identify which combinations are most effective, and study the effects of the combinations on the biology of the cancer.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by exploring a large number of different combinations before taking the most effective forward for more detailed tests to see if it is likely to be safe and effective in patients.

What could this achieve?

Exciting new radiotherapy approaches can carry radioactive treatments directly to the cancer site, but this doesn't work for everyone. Combining radiotherapy with other treatments could lead to better outcomes and fewer side-effects for those with advanced prostate cancer.

How?

Professor Cornelissen and his team will combine the radiotherapy treatment 177LU-PSMA with approximately 1,000 drugs. They will identify which combinations are most effective, and study the effects of the combinations on the biology of the cancer.

The Future- what’s next?

The researchers will begin by exploring a large number of different combinations before taking the most effective forward for more detailed tests to see if it is likely to be safe and effective in patients.

Project Start

January 2020

Research Facility

University of Oxford

Budget

£100,000/year

End

January 2021

Professor Bart Cornelissen

Principal Investigator

Bart grew up in Belgium, where he studied chemistry at the universities of Hasselt and Ghent. After obtaining a PhD in radiopharmacy at the University of Ghent, he moved to Toronto, Canada, as a post-doctoral researcher. Crossing the Atlantic Again, Bart came to Oxford in 2007, where he has led his independent research group since 2013. Now 12 strong, the team studies molecular imaging and therapy methods to aid cancer patients.

Dr Tiffany Chan

Tiffany Chan obtained her MSci in Chemistry and MRes in Neurotechnology from Imperial College London. She then undertook a PhD degree in Chemistry at Imperial College London, affiliated with the Centre of Excellence in Neurotechnology and the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Her PhD project was co-supervised by Prof. Ramon Vilar and Dr. James Choi and involved the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain diseases and non-invasive ways to deliver them across the blood-brain barrier. Tiffany joined the Cornelissen Group at the University of Oxford as a postdoctoral researcher in January 2020, where she is working on improving 177Lu-PSMA therapy.

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