If you are over 50, you can ask your doctor for a PSA test.

PSA screening is not recommended by authorities in the UK or the US.

It has not been proven that the benefits outweigh the risks.

PSA is not a good diagnostic test, but it is the best we have.

Above a level of 10 ng/ml, the PSA test is better at diagnosing prostate cancer.

If you have a PSA test, there are lots of things to think about, including:

  • About 15% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer are not identified by the test.
  • About 75% of men with raised PSA levels between 4 and 10 ng/ml do not have cancer.
  • All these men with raised PSA levels will require a biopsy to rule out prostate cancer.
  • PSA screening will diagnose some men with advanced prostate cancer.

 For about 80% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer as a result of PSA screening:

  • The cancer will not affect their survival.
  • They will have to live with the psychological consequences of prostate cancer.
  • They may want treatment, affecting their potency and continence.        

PSA screening may not increase the survival of men with advanced prostate cancer.

PSA stands for "prostate-specific antigen", but for many men it "promotes stress and anxiety".