Project No. 03

The Spread of Prostate Cancer

An exciting new approach to stop the spread of prostate cancer around the body

S c r o l l   R i g h t

The Project

The spread of prostate cancer project is conducting world-first research into cell division and decoding the deadly spread of prostate cancer.

How?

Dr Williamson has discovered that an overexpression of the protein PlexinB1 is common in cases of advanced prostate cancer. The work is now looking to inhibit PlexinB1's functions and stop the cancer spreading.

PlexinB1

PlexinB1 has healthy and necessary functions, so it is important not to 'knock-out' all it's functions. The aim is to develop 'monoclonal' antibodies and only target the functions relevant to the spread of cancerous cells.

What could this achieve?

New antibodies that stop the spread of prostate cancer cells could contain early prostate cancer within the prostate, therefore stopping it from becoming advanced.

The Future

Dr Williamson and her team are currently testing a range of different drugs and, with the results, will begin to look at using them at different stages of the disease.

The Project

The spread of prostate cancer project is conducting world-first research into cell division and decoding the deadly spread of prostate cancer.

How?

Dr Williamson has discovered that an overexpression of the protein PlexinB1 is common in cases of advanced prostate cancer. The work is now looking to inhibit PlexinB1's functions and stop the cancer spreading.

PlexinB1

PlexinB1 has healthy and necessary functions, so it is important not to 'knock-out' all it's functions. The aim is to develop 'monoclonal' antibodies and only target the functions relevant to the spread of cancerous cells.

What could this achieve?

New antibodies that stop the spread of prostate cancer cells could contain early prostate cancer within the prostate, therefore stopping it from becoming advanced.

The Future

Dr Williamson and her team are currently testing a range of different drugs and, with the results, will begin to look at using them at different stages of the disease.

Project Start

December 2014

Research Facility

Cancer Division, King’s College London

Budget

£95,000/year

End

December 2019

Dr Magali Williamson

Team Leader

Magali Williamson obtained a BSc degree in Biochemistry from Imperial College London and a PhD from the Institute of Child Health, University College London. She then worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Marie Curie Research Institute on the molecular genetics of bladder cancer, and then at the Department of Paediatrics, UCL, investigating the molecular genetics of epilepsy. In 2000 she became a lecturer at UCL, working at the Prostate Cancer Research Centre on the spread of prostate cancer. She moved to Kings College London with PCRC at the end of 2014 and continues to work on prostate cancer metastasis.
Her main research interest lies in understanding how prostate tumours spread to other parts of the body and ways in which to block this lethal process.
She first started doing prostate cancer research in order to increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which prostate cancer develops and spreads, with the aim of developing therapies to prevent death and alleviate suffering from the disease.

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